Can a Larger Vocabulary Lead to a Better Life?

People who know more words make more money, but a strong vocabulary may be worth more than its weight in gold

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(Greg Rosenke / Unsplash)
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There is a ‘30-million-word gap’ between children from different socioeconomic backgrounds (Johnny McClung / Unsplash)

If language is a trowel and brush with which to uncover the world around us, then it must also help us to understand our own inner lives.

So maybe a thesaurus isn’t the only thing separating you from Forbes’ Top 100. But maybe there’s more to life than money (maybe). If language is a trowel and brush with which to uncover the world around us, then it must also help us to understand our own inner lives, making it easier to make more refined distinctions between the feelings we experience and express our wants and needs with better precision. There’s evidence to support this — one 1999 study suggested that mothers with stronger language skills better equipped their children to regulate their emotions when confronted with frustrating situations. Vocabulary might make you more sensitive to what others are feeling, too, as some research reveals that adults with larger vocabularies exhibit higher levels of emotional intelligence.

I write about words and run about screaming. Irish, currently doing an MA in English Linguistics and Literature. clarech.carrd.co

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